WILDLIFE

Creating a Home for Oregon’s Native Wildlife

Having wildlife on your forestland isn't just a matter of chance. Creatures large and small have specific food, cover, space, and water needs. If you manage your land with those needs in mind, you'll soon have a lively response.

Regardless of where you live or how much property you own, there are many things you can do to enhance wildlife habitat. This effort can span from putting up bird houses to restoring a native endangered ecosystem like an oak savannah. What you choose to do will depend on your property, your land management objectives, and your resources, including money and time.

Learn More about Managing for Wildlife on your Property

We are lucky in Oregon, in that there are many resources to help you make wildlife decisions on your property. You might start by watching the video “Enhancing Wildlife Habitat”. This will give you a great overview of some options. If you decide that you want to make wildlife a priority in your forest plan, then continue to explore the additional literature to learn about specific species of interest, and see who in your area can help.

For more information, please conact:
Nicole Strong, Oregon State University Extension Service

 

WILDLIFE RESOURCES TO GET YOU STARTED:

Videos:

Publications:

Woodland Fish and Wildlife
The Woodland Fish and Wildlife Project is a cooperative effort between state and federal agencies and universities to provide information on fish and wildlife management to private woodland owners and managers. Organizations involved in this project have cooperatively produced publications that serve as practical guides to woodland owners. 

OSU Extension Service Publications
Oregon State University Extension has several practical publications on wildlife management issues. You can get these publications in hard copy from your local OSU Extension office, or online at Extension and Experiment Station Communications. Below is a selection of available publications.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Conservation Strategy Ecoregion Publications
ODFW Conservation Strategy helps prioritize localities, habitat types and species in most need of conservation work. The following 1 page Ecoregion publications can help you learn more about where you live and important species and habitats in your area.

Oregon Forest Resources Institute (OFRI)
OFRI is dedicated to elevating the publicʼs understanding of how forest stewardship meets social, environmental and economic needs of both present and future generations. OFRI produces materials for public, landowner and K-12 education. Explore their extensive library of publications and videos.

  • Wildlife in Managed Forests: Oregon Forests as Habitat
    This publication provides a background and context for better understanding the interplay between forest management and wildlife. It also provides forest landowners suggested management techniques to accomplish diverse wildlife habitat and highlights Oregon landowners through a series of case studies who have applied these techniques and goals on their lands.
  • Wildlife in Managed Forests: Deer and Elk
    This 24-page publication is one of a series of OFRI publications being developed for use by forest landowners and managers to report on what is known about habitat requirements and ecological roles of various wildlife species in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. This one addresses deer and elk population dynamics, herd productivity, nutritional needs and response to human disturbance.
  • Wildlife in Managed Forests: Spotted Owl
    This publication is one of a series of OFRI publications being developed for use by forest landowners and managers to report on what is known about habitat requirements and ecological roles of various wildlife species in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. This one addresses spotted owl populations and habitat.
  • Wildlife in Managed Forests: Stream-associated Amphibians
    The new report, Stream-Associated Amphibians, introduces you to the common amphibians of the region and explores the relationship between forest management and amphibian health.
  • Fact Sheet: Wildlife
    Why do forest animals live where they do? This one-page fact sheet explores the relationship between forest ages and the animals that live there.
  • Guide to Priority Plant and Animal Species in Oregon Forests
    This revised and updated publication is designed to assist forest landowners, land managers, students and educators in understanding how forests provide habitat for different wildlife and plant species. It describes the specific habitat requirements of selected species found in forested habitats across all ecoregions in Oregon.

Other:

  • Oregon State University Extension Service
    Find your local county office:
  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
    The federal NRCS, as well as your local Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD), can help with conservation planning and practices, maintaining and improving the soil, water, and other natural resources that support productive and profitable agricultural and forestry operations. To Contact NRCS: See the phone book's federal government pages for the office center in your area or visit Natural Resources Conservation Service online.
  • Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
    The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has several regional offices throughout the state of Oregon. Their Conservation Strategy includes strategy habitat and species information. Individual wildlife or Conservation Strategy biologists can help you enhance your property for fish and wildlife.
  • APHIS (Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service) Wildlife Damage Department
    The mission of USDA APHIS Wildlife Services (WS) is to provide Federal leadership and expertise to resolve wildlife conflicts to allow people and wildlife to coexist.  Phone: (503) 326-2346 Toll Free: 1-866-4USDAWS http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage/nwrc/field/oregon/indexor.shtml
  • Oregon Forest BioDiversity Explorer
    The Oregon Forest BioDiversity Explorer provides data on species occurrences and/or modeled distributions for Oregon's important forest species and habitats. Learn how to use this mapping tool by watching this online demonstration.